Save Your Skin, As Featured in Runner’s World

The other day I was in my robe, relaxing and preparing for an enjoyable (yet probably painful) facial when the esthetician came in and asked me if I was ready. I responded yes. Her next question: “Wow, you’ve been in the sun a lot!” I immediately sank down into the table wondering what my poor young 31-year-old skin must look like for her to say that. I immediately responded: “Is it that bad?” Which she quickly answered with: “Your tan lines? They are pretty funny.” Phew…I thought inside my head. She was referring to my swimsuit and sports bra tan lines as signs I had been in the sun, and not the skin on my face!

While at that moment I was out of the clear, it’s important to pay attention to your skin – especially if you are an athlete spending a lot of time exercising, running, biking and/or swimming in the sun. Here is a good article from Runner’s World that talks about how to not only protect your skin but your feet from calluses; your inner thighs from chafing; your face from acne; and more! When you are talking about skin, there’s a lot to keep up on! Please read on!

saveyourskinjun500_3Runner’s World: Save Your Skin

Running is both your skin’s best friend (that rosy sheen) and its worst enemy (sun damage, sweat-induced acne). And need we even mention a runner’s camera-unready feet, with unsightly calluses and lurking fungi? Since you’re not going to hang up your running shoes as a skin-saving strategy, take these steps to keep your epidermis—from tender toes to the tips of your ears—safe, healthy, and well cared for. This includes:

  • Be Sun Smart;
  • Protect Your Feet;
  • Prevent Acne; and
  • Avoid Chafing!

Read details as to how and more here.

While we are on the subject of skin protection, I wanted to refer you to this past Palm Beach Post article about a young woman with melanoma.

Running & Weight Loss: A MUST Read!

runners connectThis is a must read article for all athletes, and especially girls and women. It is courtesy of RunnersConnect.net, a team of expert coaches and fellow runners dedicated to improving one’s training and racing through community motivation, social engagement, unparalleled knowledge, and proven training plans. (The founder/creator was a fellow Brown University cross country and track athlete!) Basically this is a BLOG / website that everyone should have in their back pocket…especially runners!!!!

Running and Weight Loss: An In-Depth Look at the

Relationship Between Exercise and Energy Balance

Last week, I introduced metabolism and described how body weight and resting metabolic rate (RMR) are connected. I also mentioned that there are three components to metabolism: resting metabolic rate, the thermic effect of food, and energy expended for physical activity.

In this article, we’ll shift from the metabolic process and focus on the physical activity portion of metabolism and discuss the ways in which exercise can affect energy balance.

Read the rest of the article here: http://runnersconnect.net/running-nutrition-articles/running-and-weight-loss-exercise-and-energy-balance/

Tips From Nutritional Health Coach Pamela Higgins

pam higginsMy friend Pamela Higgins is a health coach and writes a column for the Examiner. She’s had some great tips recently that I wanted to share. Enjoy and feel free to reach out to her directly at http://www.totalhealthcounseling.com.

Top 10 Tips to a Healthier You

Do you want to eat healthier but think it’s too complicated or means only eating salads? There are so many simple steps you can take to enhance your health. It starts by taking action today and jumping in for the challenge! You are worth it and wouldn’t it be wonderful to feel great and look fabulous, and have a healthy?

  1. Add creamy avocado slices to your burgers and sandwiches instead of mayo or fancy aioli (i.e. mayo) spreads.
  2. Skip the deep-fried french fries and order baked sweet potato instead or grilled veggies.
  3. Start the day with a big glass of water and squeeze a whole lemon or lime in the glass, this will hydrate and alkalize your body instantly! You’ll hydrate and get a boost of energy first thing in the morning!

Read on for tips 4 – 10 here: http://www.examiner.com/list/top-10-tips-to-a-healthier-you.

Classic Tasting Chocolate Chip Cookiescookie

Who doesn’t love a good homemade chocolate chip cookie? I <3 cookies but my body is so sensitive that I can’t eat the classic version made with butter and white flour. Good thing there are other ingredients that can make a cookie that’s just as divine without the belly ache. These have a good amount of protein from the chickpeas, I imagine you can use any bean you have on hand. Pinto beans would make a pretty pink shaded cookie. This makes a small batch. This is my version of Donielle’s Gluten Free, Grain Free Chocolate Chip Cookie.

Find the recipe here: http://www.totalhealthcounseling.com/2013/classic-tasting-chocolate-chip-cookies/

 

 

Boston Marathon: A Runner’s View

While I was MIA from blogging on RunningTips101.com, I of course missed commenting and sharing my perspective on the Boston Marathon bombings. I found this beautiful piece written by a runner and published in the New Yorker. Please enjoy:

 

BOSTON, FROM ONE CITIZEN OF THE WORLD WHO CALLS HIMSELF A RUNNER

POSTED BY Huraki Murakami

In the past thirty years, I’ve run thirty-three full marathons. I’ve run marathons all over the world, but whenever someone asks me which is my favorite, I never hesitate to answer: the Boston Marathon, which I have run six times. What’s so wonderful about the Boston Marathon? It’s simple: it’s the oldest race of its kind; the course is beautiful; and—here’s the most important point—everything about the race is natural, free. The Boston Marathon is not a top-down but a bottom-up kind of event; it was steadily, thoughtfully crafted by the citizens of Boston themselves, over a considerable period of time. Every time I run the race, the feelings of the people who created it over the years are on display for all to appreciate, and I’m enveloped in a warm glow, a sense of being back in a place I missed. It’s magical. Other marathons are amazing, too—the New York City Marathon, the Honolulu Marathon, the Athens Marathon. Boston, however (my apologies to the organizers of those other races), is unique.Boston Marathon bombing

What’s great about marathons in general is the lack of competitiveness. For world-class runners, they can be an occasion of fierce rivalry, sure. But for a runner like me (and I imagine this is true for the vast majority of runners), an ordinary runner whose times are nothing special, a marathon is never a competition. You enter the race to enjoy the experience of running twenty-six miles, and you do enjoy it, as you go along. Then it starts to get a little painful, then it becomes seriously painful, and in the end it’s that pain that you start to enjoy. And part of the enjoyment is in sharing this tangled process with the runners around you. Try running twenty-six miles alone and you’ll have three, four, or five hours of sheer torture. I’ve done it before, and I hope never to repeat the experience. But running the same distance alongside other runners makes it feel less grueling. It’s tough physically, of course—how could it not be?—but there’s a feeling of solidarity and unity that carries you all the way to the finish line. If a marathon is a battle, it’s one you wage against yourself.

Running the Boston Marathon, when you turn the corner at Hereford Street onto Boylston, and see, at the end of that straight, broad road, the banner at Copley Square, the excitement and relief you experience are indescribable. You have made it on your own, but at the same time it was those around you who kept you going. The unpaid volunteers who took the day off to help out, the people lining the road to cheer you on, the runners in front of you, the runners behind. Without their encouragement and support, you might not have finished the race. As you take the final sprint down Boylston, all kinds of emotions rise up in your heart. You grimace with the strain, but you smile as well.

* * * 
 I lived for three years on the outskirts of Boston. I was a visiting scholar at Tufts for two years, and then, after a short break, I was at Harvard for a year. During that time, I jogged along the banks of the Charles River every morning. I understand how important the Boston Marathon is to the people of Boston, what a source of pride it is to the city and its citizens. Many of my friends regularly run the race and serve as volunteers. So, even from far away, I can imagine how devastated and discouraged the people of Boston feel about the tragedy of this year’s race. Many people were physically injured at the site of the explosions, but even more must have been wounded in other ways. Something that should have been pure has been sullied, and I, too—as a citizen of the world, who calls himself a runner—have been wounded.

This combination of sadness, disappointment, anger, and despair is not easy to dissipate. I understood this when I was researching my book “Underground,” about the 1995 gas attack on the Tokyo subway, and interviewing survivors of the attack and family members of those who died. You can overcome the hurt enough to live a “normal” life. But, internally, you’re still bleeding. Some of the pain goes away over time, but the passage of time also gives rise to new types of pain. You have to sort it all out, organize it, understand it, and accept it. You have to build a new life on top of the pain.

* * * 
 Surely the best-known section of the Boston Marathon is Heartbreak Hill, one in a series of slopes that lasts for four miles near the end of the race. It’s on Heartbreak Hill that runners ostensibly feel the most exhausted. In the hundred-and-seventeen-year history of the race, all sorts of legends have grown up around this hill. But, when you actually run it, you realize that it’s not as harsh and unforgiving as people have made it out to be. Most runners make it up Heartbreak Hill more easily than they expected to. “Hey,” they tell themselves, “that wasn’t so bad after all.” Mentally prepare yourself for the long slope that is waiting for you near the end, save up enough energy to tackle it, and somehow you’re able to get past it.

The real pain begins only after you’ve conquered Heartbreak Hill, run downhill, and arrived at the flat part of the course, in the city streets. You’re through the worst, and you can head straight for the finish line—and suddenly your body starts to scream. Your muscles cramp, and your legs feel like lead. At least that’s what I’ve experienced every time I’ve run the Boston Marathon.

Emotional scars may be similar. In a sense, the real pain begins only after some time has passed, after you’ve overcome the initial shock and things have begun to settle. Only once you’ve climbed the steep slope and emerged onto level ground do you begin to feel how much you’ve been hurting up till then. The bombing in Boston may very well have left this kind of long-term mental anguish behind.

Why? I can’t help asking. Why did a happy, peaceful occasion like the marathon have to be trampled on in such an awful, bloody way? Although the perpetrators have been identified, the answer to that question is still unclear. But their hatred and depravity have mangled our hearts and our minds. Even if we were to get an answer, it likely wouldn’t help.

To overcome this kind of trauma takes time, time during which we need to look ahead positively. Hiding the wounds, or searching for a dramatic cure, won’t lead to any real solution. Seeking revenge won’t bring relief, either. We need to remember the wounds, never turn our gaze away from the pain, and—honestly, conscientiously, quietly—accumulate our own histories. It may take time, but time is our ally.

For me, it’s through running, running every single day, that I grieve for those whose lives were lost and for those who were injured on Boylston Street. This is the only personal message I can send them. I know it’s not much, but I hope that my voice gets through. I hope, too, that the Boston Marathon will recover from its wounds, and that those twenty-six miles will again seem beautiful, natural, free.

Read on: http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2013/05/murakami-running-boston-marathon-bombing.html

SloBody Opens In Delray Beach; Offers FREE Classes During Soft Opening Week

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NAKED YOGA COMES TO DELRAY BEACH

Grand Opening of This Unique Workout Generates Excitement

Fitness enthusiasts of Delray Beach can look forward to SloBody’s Soft Opening week (including complimentary classes) from Saturday, June 1 to Saturday, June 8, 2013 and Grand Opening in Delray Beach, Florida on Tuesday, June 11 at 5:00pm. SloBody – conditioning infused yoga™ – is a trademarked workout method that Strengthens, Lengthens, and Opens the Body. Located at 209 NE 5th Terrace in Delray Beach, the first Florida SloBody location will bring a focus to the client’s individual needs through consistent personal attention and correction.

Complimentary one-hour SloBody classes will be offered on the following dates/times:

  • Saturday, June 1 at 10:00am
  • Monday, June 3 at 9:30am and 6:00pm
  • Wednesday, June 5 at 9:30am and 6:00pm
  • Friday, June 7 at 6:30am
  • Saturday, June 8 at 10:00am

The Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting ceremony will be held Tuesday, June 11 from 5:00 to 6:30pm and will include a tour of the facility, a meet-and-greet with founders Kirk Slobody and Janine Tiede, a brief SloBody class, and refreshments and food provided by Delray Beach establishment Fit Food Express.

Former NCAA Division I athletes and masters at breaking movement down, Kirk Slobody and Janine Tiede, created SloBody. By stripping Yoga to the essence of what makes it great exercise and blending it with old school conditioning (squats, lunges, core work, push-ups) they created a unique workout that builds: strength, awareness, balance, flexibility, and mobility.

Despite the “naked yoga” description, clients are told to keep their clothes on as yoga is the one being undressed! At SloBody, there is no chanting, no incense, no gurus and no embellishments. Instead, there is just yoga postures and conditioning.

“The traditional vibe of Guru…didn’t jive with my personality. I didn’t want to smell the incense, hear the chanting, or deal with dogma that was a distraction to my goals. For me it was a natural progression to blend yoga postures and breath awareness into a more athletic conditioning structure,” explains Kirk, owner and co-founder of SloBody.

After thirteen years of proven results in Seattle, Washington, SloBody– conditioning infused yoga™ comes to South Florida to build athletes at any age – and starting at any conditioning level. Kirk and Janine take the beginners through the awkward stages of starting an exercise routine to reaping the rewards of fitness.

Online classes compliment the education. SloBody’s Online Training pages are your gateway to information that is safe, practical and efficient. Subscriptions range from free to several different levels. It includes:

  • PRO Package –  Designed for professionals and teachers
  • ESSENTIAL Package – Designed for motivated students
  • DAILY DOZEN POSTURES – Essential postures via Video, PDF, etc.
  • DESK YOGA – Quick simple exercises for home or office
  • MODIFYING YOGA POSES – Great for newbies!
  • TEACHING YOGA EFFECTIVELY – Designed for teachers

SloBody’s method could change the way South Florida thinks of fitness. It is an adaptable workout that provides physical and mental fitness for a lifetime. The skills are transferable to any sport, physical discipline, and life in general.  The method is founded in the body – body based exercises, not equipment based – which means one can do it anywhere and anytime. Even at home naked if you really wanted to– just be sure to close the curtains!

About the SloBody® Method
SloBody – conditioning infused yoga™ – is a trademarked workout method that strengthens, lengthens and opens your body to its full potential and range of motion. SloBody introduces a one of a kind strength conditioning regimen (squats, lunges, core work, push-ups) and combines them with stress-combating yoga postures and efficient breathing for a workout that builds muscle, self-awareness, balance, flexibility, and improved mobility. The SloBody teaching method, which has been utilized as a training method by corporations such as Starbucks, Bank of America, Nike, the Seattle Police SWAT Team, and the Washington Athletic Club, is highly influenced by years of experience in the fitness industry. Noticing a lack of breaking down movements and/or providing alternative options for the injured or fitness novices in other group exercise classes, the SloBody method was formed. Learn more at www.SloBody.com.

For more information about SloBody, or to schedule an interview with Kirk Slobody or Janine Tiede, please contact media representative Melissa Perlman at 561-310-9921 or Melissa@blueivycommunications.com.

Keep Calm, I’m Back!

keep calm i am backHello friends, readers and fellow runners:

It’s been a while…actually a really long while…since I’ve posted and/or blogged on RunningTips101.com so I wanted to apologize!

But the good news is that we’ve got a lot of stuff coming  up that I’ve been planning on sharing/writing about…and now with a few extra moments of time (Track season just ended for Florida high schools), I can finally put it all on the blog!

Sneak peak of what’s on its way to RunningTips101.com:

  • Track and Field season summary from Spanish River High School; how the season turned out, what I learn about our athletes, running and competition in general, and how the runners did (for example we had one make it to states and finish well!!!);
  • SloBody(r): Brand new conditioning infused yoga studio opening in Delray Beach on June 1st with a week of FREE classes!!! Details, directions, pictures to come!
  • Juicing Cleanse: Yep, I am finally doing a full-out juicing cleanse. Have never done a REAL one before so this should be interesting. Three days of just juice. I purchased the cleanse from On Juice, owned by Boca Raton’s Deliver Lean, and I’m excited to share the details and results. Maybe some of you will try as well!?
  • Israel’s Maccabi Games: The games are under two months away! I leave July 10th for Israel and will be running at the end of the month – in the half marathon race. Details on how you can support me if you are interested?! How my training is going?! (Really well by the way!) More information an upcoming 5K race here in Boca Raton that I’ll be racing to get used to competition again! And what it will be like traveling and running (in Israel of all places)!

Lot’s to come obviously! I can’t wait to share!

-Melissa