Tag Archives: Jewish

European Maccabi Games – 2015

_MG_4141In less than one week, I will be joining 250 other individuals from the United States in Berlin, Germany for the European Maccabi Games! I am super excited for this opportunity and promise to enjoy, celebrate and appreciate every moment of it. I will be there representing much more than just me…

Please bookmark this page as I will be updating you on my journey throughout the trip as much as I can. I will also be blogging for the Maccabi USA/Sports for Israel team along with many of my USA teammates. The Maccabi USA website is http://www.maccabiusa.com.

About the European Maccabi Games
From July 27th until August 5th, the 14th European Maccabi Games (EMG2015) will take place in Berlin. The EMG2015 are Europe’s biggest Jewish sports event wih more than 2,000 athletes, coaches and counselors from over 30 European countries and the world. The competitions will be held in 19 sports.

For the first time ever, the European Maccabi Games will take place in Germany – 70 years after the end of the Shoah and the Second World War and 50 years after the establishment of the German – Israeli relations. The EMG2015 will be held at the Olympic Park in Berlin – the same location where German Jews were forbidden to participate in the Olympic Games of 1936 – as well the Half Marathon Race (which I will be racing in)!

Learn more at emg2015.de.

You an still support me in my financial requirements by making a donation to Maccabi USA here. THANK YOU!

Join My European Maccabi Games Team!

MP Headshot 2013This summer, from July 27 to August 5, the 14th European Maccabi Games (EMG2015) will take place in Berlin, Germany, and I personally have the great privilege of participating in the games as a member of Team USA’s Half Marathon Team. The EMG2015 are Europe’s biggest Jewish sports event with more than 2000 athletes, coaches and counselors from 36 countries around world. Personally, this will be my third time participating in the Maccabi Games; my first two experiences both occurred in Israel as part of the World Maccabi Games (once in 1997 as a member of the Junior Track & Field team and most recently in 2013 as a member of the Women’s Half Marathon team).

However, this summer’s experience promises to be extra meaningful. For the first time ever, the European Maccabi Games will take place in Germany – just 70 years after the end of the Shoah and the Second World War and 50 years after the establishment of German-Israeli relations. And potentially most significantly – right in the midst of a period of heightened terrorist attacks and anti-Semitism in Europe, when prominent leaders and journalists from around the world are suggesting the Jews emigrate from Europe. Further, the EMG2015 will be held at Olympic Park in Berlin, which is the same location where Jews were forbidden to participate in the Olympic Games of 1936 – less than 80 years ago.

The historic and sociopolitical importance of the EMG2015 is enormous for Germany, Berlin and the worldwide Jewish community. And the urgency of Jews like myself not backing down but rather traveling to Europe, and specifically Germany, to proudly compete in athletics and celebrate being Jewish is dire.

It is with this purpose in mind, that I humbly ask you to support me in reaching my Chaverim requirement and becoming an integral part of my personal journey to Berlin and EMG2015.

Thank you in advance for your support. If you would like to make a contribution, please visit my Maccabi USA website! The direct link is as follows: http://musa.convio.net/site/TR/Games/MaccabiTeamRaiser?px=1004341&pg=personal&fr_id=1060.

Thank you and sincerely,

Melissa Perlman

Jewish Journal: “Runner returns to Maccabi Games”

Below is an article from the South Florida Jewish Journal!!! The reporter really did his homework and a fantastic job I have to say. Very thankful! And more excited than ever to head on over to Israel! Thanks David Schwartz and photographer Todd Roller who is just as amazing a talent!

Read the online version here: Jewish Journal: Runner Returns to Maccabi Games

Jewish Journal
Jewish Journal

Maccabiah Games History: Why We Must Push Forward!

Held in Israel every four years, the Maccabiah Games is named for Jewish warrior Judah Maccabe who fought against the ancient Greeks. Many notable athletes have competed in the Maccabiah, including swimmer Mark Spitz, gymnast Mitch Gaylord, golfer Corey Pavin, basketball players Ernie Grunfeld and Danny Shayes and tennis player Dick Savitt. The following is a brief history of the games:

Maccabiah I (1932) — The first Maccabiah Games was nicknamed the “White Horse Olympics” because Tel Aviv mayor Dizengoff led a parade honoring the games through the city streets while riding a white horse. The opening ceremony witnessed the release of 120 carrier pigeons, 10 pigeons for each of the 12 tribes of Israel, whose mission was to send to the world news of the opening of the first Maccabiah games. Approximately 390 athletes from 14 countries participated in the competition.

Maccabiah II (1935) — These games were was held despite official opposition by the British Mandatory government. A German delegation of 134 Jews flouted Nazi Germany’s order not to attend the games and the delegation refused to fly the German flag during the opening ceremonies. The games became known as the “Aliyah Olympics” because many of the athletes from the various countries chose to remain and settle in Israel. With few exceptions, the Bulgarian delegation stayed in Israel, sending home their sports equipment and musical instruments. A total of 28 countries were represented by 1,350 athletes.

Maccabiah III (1950) — Originally scheduled for 1938, the event was postponed because of the international political situation and British fears of an upsurge in illegal immigration. The first games to be held after the Holocaust and the establishment of the State of Israel was attended by 800 athletes representing 19 countries.

Maccabiah IV (1953) — This Maccabiah initiated the tradition of bringing from Modi’in, Judah Maccabee’s birthplace, the torch used to light the flame at the opening ceremony. A total of 890 athletes from 12 countries participated.

Maccabiah V (1957) — Some Eastern European countries did not send delegations to protest the Sinai Campaign. Competitors included American weightlifter and Olympic gold medalist Isaac Berger and Australian national tennis champion Eva Dulding. Hungarian four-time Olympic gold medalist Agnes Kleti performed in two exhibitions. The policy of playing the Maccabiah every four years was established.

Maccabiah VI (1961) — The International Olympics Committee endowed the Maccabi World Union with Olympic standing and declared the Maccabiah a “Regional Sports Event.” American Dick Savitt won two gold medals. Exhibitions were performed by two American Olympic medalists, Rafer Johnson (decathlon) and John Thomas (high jump). The event had 1,000 competitors from 27 nations.

Maccabiah VII (1965) — Several well-known athletes won medals, including swimmer Mark Spitz (winner of seven gold medals in the Munich Olympics), swimmer Marilyn Ramenofsky (then USA record-holder and silver medalist in the Rome Olympics in the 400-meter freestyle) and international tennis player Tom Okker (Holland).

Maccabiah VIII (1969) — Wimbledon winner Julie Heldman participated in the eighth Maccabiah.

Maccabiah IX (1973) — This event was dedicated to the 11 Israeli Olympians murdered by terrorists during the 1972 Munich Olympics. (Russell Perlman participated.)

Maccabiah X (1977) — “The Jubilee Maccabiah” marked 25 years of Maccabiah competition. More than 2,700 competitors from 33 countries participated.

Maccabiah XI (1981) — The games honored the memory of Maccabiah World Union President and International Maccabiah Games Committee President Pierre Gildesgame who died in a car accident. Thirty countries sent 3,450 to play in the games. Dan Shayes, the future Denver Nugget, played for the American basketball squad.

Maccabiah XII (1985) — Olympic legend Mark Spitz opened the games lighting a torch along with three children of Israeli Olympians murdered at the Munich Olympics. Four thousand sportsman from 40 countries attended the games. The junior Maccabiah was established.

Maccabiah XIII (1889) — The opening torch was carried by former world swimming champion Hanoch Budin, an IDF disabled veteran. The event brought together 4,500 athletes from 45 countries.

Maccabiah XIV (1993)— A total 5,500 athletes from 57 nations competed.

Maccabiah XV (1997) — Former Montreal Canadien coach Jacques Demers led a Canadian hockey squad consisting of numerous NHL players. The event was marred when a pedestrian bridge collapsed and four Australian athletes were killed and more than 60 other people were injured. (Melissa Perlman participated as a junior member of the track team.)

Maccabiah XVI (2001) — On the verge of cancellation because of ongoing violence, the 16th Maccabiah attracted more than 3,000 athletes from 41 Countries to participate in 44 sports. Women’s basketball returned to the Games and women’s soccer was added. U.S. Olympic swimming gold medalist and former world record holder, Lenny Krayzelburg earned a gold and set a new Maccabiah record in the 100 meter backstroke.

Maccabiah XVII (2005) — Some 7,000 athletes from 55 countries participated in the 2005 Maccabiah Games.

Maccabiah XVIII (2009) — Approximately 9,000 athletes from 54 countries participated.

Next up: Maccabiah XVIV (2013) – Melissa Perlman to participate again. Interested in supporting and keeping the tradition going? Click here.

19th World Maccabiah Games, Team USA

It’s a countdown to the Israel! Support me as I train for the Half Marathon race at the 19th World Maccabiah Games in Israel in 2013. As I get my training started and progress through the Fall, Winter, Spring and Summer…I will be sharing updates right here for you! Look out for the heading “19th World Maccabiah Games” to stay in the know with my training and ultimately results!

Interested in supporting me? I will be sure to make mention of you (and/or your company) right here to make sure you get the public thank you deserve!

On that note, I’d like to start off with special thanks to the following individuals who have already supported me and my journey back to Israel for Team USA:

  • Russ Perlman
  • Valentina Moretti
  • Jeannie Stave