Tag Archives: Maccabiah Games

20th Maccabiah Games Recap

I returned from Israel just a couple of days ago and I am just coming up for air! The jet lag combined with time spent catching up on work, sleep, family/friends and my puppy has kept me pretty busy…and honestly SLEEP has dominated everything else (sorry!).

So I truly apologize for the lack of posting here on the site. I planned to post throughout the games as I travelled through Israel with Team USA but the schedule (between travel and training) was rough!

The best I can do is catch you up here on the last three weeks! And then I’ll gradually share snippets in the coming weeks and months! So read on…and let me know if there are specifics that you want me to follow-up on! I learned a lot, I saw a lot and I’ve definitely got a lot to share!

The RACE. 

I went in with hopes and plans to run sub 1:29 for the half marathon. I trained for that and was confident I could do it. That was until we arrived in Jerusalem and I saw the Jerusalem terrain and specifically the Half Marathon course. It was HILLY – and when I say HILLY I mean MOUNTAINOUS. (So hilly, in fact, that I ran on the treadmill the week leading up the race in an effort to keep my confidence up and avoid as many hills outside the hotel we were staying in that I could!)

Coming from Florida, anything with hills is probably a little outside my comfort zone. But I try to be pretty relaxed when it comes to racing these days and figured ‘hey, all competitors will be facing the same course’ and moved on.

The race started at just before 9:00pm Israel time and I went in with the following strategy: Go out conservative, stay relaxed, stay aerobic (per Doug) and don’t let those hills kill your legs too early on. From walking the Jerusalem hills the week prior, I knew what they could do to my legs pretty quickly…and I promised myself I would take it easy and not allow the lactic acid to build up too early on. (I wanted this to be an enjoyable race…and not unnecessarily painful.)

Mile one was just over 7 minutes (7:03 to be exact). The first 800 meters was up hill and I took it easy. I’d say 70% of the field probably passed me at this point…but I kept reminding myself: ‘this is a 13.1 mile race’ and I’ll catch them later. Same for mile two (7:07). I think it was mile three that I started to feel my rhythm, get comfortable and develop my race plan .

  1. Stay relaxed on the hills and get up them with small rapid steps. Allow the body to lean in and move up easily. Do not let the body go anaerobic or let the lactic acid build up in the legs.
  2. Attack the down hills (which I personally love) and let the body go, the stride expand and the arms / upper body relax. Boy did I love those down hills (except where it got super windy).
  3. And on the few areas of flat ground (honestly – probably adding up to two miles total), pick up the speed!

The race was two loops that repeated so the constant up hill, down hill, flat, up hill, down hill, flat course became the norm and made the race go by super fast. I was spending so much time looking forward to the down hill and flat areas, that before I knew it we were at 10miles in.

I pretty much ran alone or just behind a few Israeli guys – who chatted with me every so often (where was I from, what was my race goal, etc.). While I tried to keep the chatter to a minimum, one of those guys ended up being a life saver later on – giving me the heads up in the last 3.1 miles on upcoming hills, sharp turns, and more. (Thanks David! David had run this course many times prior.)

The last three miles was where I really wanted to pick up the pace and be aggressive with catching up to some of the leaders ahead of me. I felt great at this point…but I also had a tough 3.1 miles ahead of me. Lots of up hills, lots of tight turns and a 1k through the Old City (on slippery cobblestone, etc.).  My total time for that last 5k was just under 22 minutes, which was solid, but not enough to catch me up.

With under 1k left in the race, as we ran down the final Old City hill and onto the Mamilla straightaway, I remember looking to my left over the city of Jerusalem – and thinking this is truly beautiful, and this experience has been amazing. I then finished up my last 800 or so meters wishing the end was closer (as always), and focusing on my form so I could finish strong.

My final finish: 1:33 and change and a third place in Maccabiah Open competition (fourth place overall – including a Master’s woman). But most importantly, I ran proud, strong, and happy. Another Maccabiah, another amazing experience.

Thank you to my teammates who were out there with me; Doug and Coach Rothman for the advice; Leah for the training plan; my family for cheering me on on the course – I LOVE having you out there just like my high school days; Lauren for the extra support and goo/water on hand; and Mark for the “strong” statements and goo at halfway mark!

Returning to Maccabi in Israel

Twenty years after my first trip to Israel with team USA as part of the World Maccabiah Games, I am heading back during the Summer of 2017. Its the 20th Games and its 20 years since my first foray into Maccabi. I have been to numerous games since, including the 2013 Maccabi Games and the 2015 European Games, but I am super excited to go back to where it all got started!

Join me on my journey back as I blog my training plan, fundraising journey, and excitement right here. Only 150 days to go!

I will be representing the Women’s Open Half Marathon Team and will compete in mid-July in Jerusalem, Israel. Feel free to ask questions, leave comments, and join me as I prepare!

More about me and my last Maccabi experience in Berlin, Germany: http://forward.com/news/318584/representing-jews-at-the-maccabi-games-in-berlin/

Fundraising: http://support.maccabiusa.com/site/TR?px=1004341&fr_id=1090&pg=personal

Thanks so much!

Melissa

Join My European Maccabi Games Team!

MP Headshot 2013This summer, from July 27 to August 5, the 14th European Maccabi Games (EMG2015) will take place in Berlin, Germany, and I personally have the great privilege of participating in the games as a member of Team USA’s Half Marathon Team. The EMG2015 are Europe’s biggest Jewish sports event with more than 2000 athletes, coaches and counselors from 36 countries around world. Personally, this will be my third time participating in the Maccabi Games; my first two experiences both occurred in Israel as part of the World Maccabi Games (once in 1997 as a member of the Junior Track & Field team and most recently in 2013 as a member of the Women’s Half Marathon team).

However, this summer’s experience promises to be extra meaningful. For the first time ever, the European Maccabi Games will take place in Germany – just 70 years after the end of the Shoah and the Second World War and 50 years after the establishment of German-Israeli relations. And potentially most significantly – right in the midst of a period of heightened terrorist attacks and anti-Semitism in Europe, when prominent leaders and journalists from around the world are suggesting the Jews emigrate from Europe. Further, the EMG2015 will be held at Olympic Park in Berlin, which is the same location where Jews were forbidden to participate in the Olympic Games of 1936 – less than 80 years ago.

The historic and sociopolitical importance of the EMG2015 is enormous for Germany, Berlin and the worldwide Jewish community. And the urgency of Jews like myself not backing down but rather traveling to Europe, and specifically Germany, to proudly compete in athletics and celebrate being Jewish is dire.

It is with this purpose in mind, that I humbly ask you to support me in reaching my Chaverim requirement and becoming an integral part of my personal journey to Berlin and EMG2015.

Thank you in advance for your support. If you would like to make a contribution, please visit my Maccabi USA website! The direct link is as follows: http://musa.convio.net/site/TR/Games/MaccabiTeamRaiser?px=1004341&pg=personal&fr_id=1060.

Thank you and sincerely,

Melissa Perlman

Palm Beach Live Work Play: “Perlman Wins Gold In Israel”

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PERLMAN WINS GOLD IN ISRAEL

Aug 05, 2013

Palm Beach Champions at Maccabi Games

Hannah Pierce(Maine), Melissa Perlman(Boca),Emily Mossler(Indiana), Samantha Lee(Oregon) with their Gold Medals

PALM BEACH COUNTY ATHLETE WINS GOLD, BRONZE AT 19th MACCABIAH GAMES IN ISRAEL 


Melissa Perlman, a 31-year-old Boca Raton resident, returned home to South Florida this past week with some extra hardware. The Public Relations executive (owner of BlueIvy Communications – a PR and communications firm based in Boca Raton) and Assistant Cross Country and Track Coach at Spanish River High School in Boca Raton secured an individual bronze medal and team gold medal while in Israel competing on behalf of Team USA in the 19th Maccabiah Games.

Read the full article here: http://www.palmbeachlwp.com/news/play/perlman-wins-gold-in-israel/.

Boca News Now: “Boca PR Star Medals In Maccabiah Games”

 

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Boca PR Star Medals In Maccabiah Games

by BocaNewsNow.com Staff • 

Melissa Perlman returned from the Maccabiah Games in Tel Aviv with both a Gold and Bronze medal.

BOCA RATON, FL (BocaNewsNow.com) — Leading Boca Raton Public Relations Executive Melissa Perlman is back from Tel Aviv with a bronze medal and a gold medal, both earned during a spectacular performance in the Maccabiah Games.

Perlman runs BlueIvy Communications and is the assistant cross country and track coach at Spanish River High. She secured an individual bronze medal and team gold medal while in Israel competing on behalf of Team USA in the 19th Maccabiah Games.

Read the full article here: http://bocanewsnow.com/2013/08/05/boca-pr-star-medals-in-maccabiah-games/.

Maccabiah Games Recap: Bronze Individual Medal; Team Gold!

2Well, I have returned from Israel after three weeks…and spent the last day catching up on rest, unpacking, doing laundry, and reminscing on my time overseas. I have to say that the experience was unlike anything else. I had the absolute BEST time in Israel as a member of Team USA in the 19th Maccabiah Games. I had high expectations of everything – yet somehow the experience was better than anything imagined. I’ll keep this short but wanted to share some of the highlights:

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Team USA: The most amazing group of people and athletes ever. To have the opportunity to be back on a Track team was an experience in itself. It felt like college running again, but with the maturity that only comes with age. The mindset of a competitive runner is so unique and to be part of that addictive and passionate atmosphere again was really cool and inspiring. (So much so, I have a few new goals and plans for myself and my running/racing this Fall and onward.) The Half Marathon team specifically was my famiy while there. I cannot begin to describe how much fun I had with my group. I truly feel so lucky that our group was hand picked and put together….and I know we will be friends for a lifetime to come. First reunion is already planned for October!

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Israel: Wow! It may have been my third time in the country, but the tours, the views, the places never get old. I love that place. And to have the opportunity to see it with a new perspective on life – was a privilege. I cannot wait to go back again (4 years!)!

gold medals - half marathon - team USA

Family: It was a brief visit…but I had the opportunity to see my family while there for a day. My dad’s brother moved to Israel when he was in his 20s, joined the Israeli army, got married, raised a family and lives there today with the family. I got to see my uncle, aunt, three of my cousins as well as one of their wifes and kids. It was an amazing lunch and I am so thankful I had the time to make it happen!

Competition: Ah the competition. I said coming in that my goal was to medal and finish under 1:30 in the half marathon. But you say a lot when you have goals…and hopes. To finish the race in a 1:29:31 and to win a bronze individual medal and team gold medal was beyond my greatest expectations. The race was hard (hilly and humid); my body barely held up (still can’t put on sneakers to this day…because of how damaged my feet got – blood blisters and cuts on my heels); but my mind kept me in it…and my legs listened. I will tell you that the last 4K (a half marathon is equal to 13.1 miles or 21K) was rough and I had to do a lot of talking to get myself through it. On a personal note, I have to thank my mom (in heaven) for getting me through a lot of it. Most of my talking was to her…and apparently she listened. 🙂

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Special thanks to all those who supported my trip and experience monetarily with donations! And special thanks to my family for their support, my Spanish River team that sent me texts and facebook messages before and after the race, my high school coach Rick Rothman who was on-site and gave me the best pep talk ever, Jordana Kimelman – who despite having to race the next day and being sick – was there in full force  to take pictures of Team USA and to help me post-race, my Team USA girls who were there for me throughout the race as running partners and water passers, Rob Fellman and Coach Smolka for giving me the opportunity to be part of the Maccabiah Games, and so many more!!!!

Jewish Journal: “Runner returns to Maccabi Games”

Below is an article from the South Florida Jewish Journal!!! The reporter really did his homework and a fantastic job I have to say. Very thankful! And more excited than ever to head on over to Israel! Thanks David Schwartz and photographer Todd Roller who is just as amazing a talent!

Read the online version here: Jewish Journal: Runner Returns to Maccabi Games

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Maccabiah Games – Israel 2013

And the official countdown can being. I leave for New York July 9; Israel July 10th; and then race on July 23rd in Tel Aviv! It is starting to feel a little realer to me! Not in the super super prep and excited mode quite yet but I am sure that will come when July arrives. Maccabiah USA has also starte to send information, details and uniforms! Here is what I have so far:

  • ARRIVALS (July 10, 2013): The 1100 plus USA athletes will arrive in Israel and start meeting one another. Besides Coach Rothman (who is coaching the Junior Track team) and Rob Fellman (Track Chair and athlete), I do not know anyone! I don’t even know anyone from the half marathon team – so this should be quite exciting!
  • ISRAEL CONNECT (July 11-16, 2013): We get to see Israel and all it offers – well not all – but a lot! Including: Jerusalem, the Dead Sea, Masada, Bedouin tent dinner, Yad Vashem, and much more!
  • TRAVEL TO TEL AVIV WITH HALF MARATHON TEAM AND OTHER OPEN SPORTS TEAMS (July 17, 2013): This is where the two weeks of competition period beings. (I won’t be running until July 23 so I will have lots of time to see Israel
  • half marathon coursevisit with family, meet the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County’s partners in the region, and do some work for BlueIvy Communications!
  • HALF-MARATHON RACE (July 23, 2013): The race will take place in the evening at 8:00pm, when it could potentially cool to around 90 degrees and 90% humidity! Luckily I am from Florida so am sorta used to it! Picture of the course included below.
  • TEL-AVIV TO NEWARK TO FLORIDA (August 1, 2013)

I will share pictures in the coming weeks – and of course during the games you can follow me on my facebook page (www.facebook.com/melissaperlman). Not a friend? Just request me!

Still interested in supporting? I am still a ways away from my goal – so any little bit helps! Visit my donation page here: http://friendraising.towercare.com/Markslist/campaign/display/profile.do?campaignId=10591

More details provided to me on the Maccabiah Games: 

We represent the USA’s best Jewish athletes. Since the Games started 80 years ago, only 6,000 USA athletes have participated, many former, current or past Olympians.  Our track and field teams over the years are fewer than only 500 participants- (many are blind copied on this email.)  You are in the company of: Dwight Stones (announcer and US Olympian), Ken Flax (current NCAA record holder, US Olympian), Deena Kastor (current USA marathon record holder and USA Olympian), Irv Mondschein (USA Olympian). Jews are a small minority in the world (.25%) yet we make up of over 3% of Olympic medals. As per Adam Sandler, “not too shabby.”

Maccabiah Games History: Why We Must Push Forward!

Held in Israel every four years, the Maccabiah Games is named for Jewish warrior Judah Maccabe who fought against the ancient Greeks. Many notable athletes have competed in the Maccabiah, including swimmer Mark Spitz, gymnast Mitch Gaylord, golfer Corey Pavin, basketball players Ernie Grunfeld and Danny Shayes and tennis player Dick Savitt. The following is a brief history of the games:

Maccabiah I (1932) — The first Maccabiah Games was nicknamed the “White Horse Olympics” because Tel Aviv mayor Dizengoff led a parade honoring the games through the city streets while riding a white horse. The opening ceremony witnessed the release of 120 carrier pigeons, 10 pigeons for each of the 12 tribes of Israel, whose mission was to send to the world news of the opening of the first Maccabiah games. Approximately 390 athletes from 14 countries participated in the competition.

Maccabiah II (1935) — These games were was held despite official opposition by the British Mandatory government. A German delegation of 134 Jews flouted Nazi Germany’s order not to attend the games and the delegation refused to fly the German flag during the opening ceremonies. The games became known as the “Aliyah Olympics” because many of the athletes from the various countries chose to remain and settle in Israel. With few exceptions, the Bulgarian delegation stayed in Israel, sending home their sports equipment and musical instruments. A total of 28 countries were represented by 1,350 athletes.

Maccabiah III (1950) — Originally scheduled for 1938, the event was postponed because of the international political situation and British fears of an upsurge in illegal immigration. The first games to be held after the Holocaust and the establishment of the State of Israel was attended by 800 athletes representing 19 countries.

Maccabiah IV (1953) — This Maccabiah initiated the tradition of bringing from Modi’in, Judah Maccabee’s birthplace, the torch used to light the flame at the opening ceremony. A total of 890 athletes from 12 countries participated.

Maccabiah V (1957) — Some Eastern European countries did not send delegations to protest the Sinai Campaign. Competitors included American weightlifter and Olympic gold medalist Isaac Berger and Australian national tennis champion Eva Dulding. Hungarian four-time Olympic gold medalist Agnes Kleti performed in two exhibitions. The policy of playing the Maccabiah every four years was established.

Maccabiah VI (1961) — The International Olympics Committee endowed the Maccabi World Union with Olympic standing and declared the Maccabiah a “Regional Sports Event.” American Dick Savitt won two gold medals. Exhibitions were performed by two American Olympic medalists, Rafer Johnson (decathlon) and John Thomas (high jump). The event had 1,000 competitors from 27 nations.

Maccabiah VII (1965) — Several well-known athletes won medals, including swimmer Mark Spitz (winner of seven gold medals in the Munich Olympics), swimmer Marilyn Ramenofsky (then USA record-holder and silver medalist in the Rome Olympics in the 400-meter freestyle) and international tennis player Tom Okker (Holland).

Maccabiah VIII (1969) — Wimbledon winner Julie Heldman participated in the eighth Maccabiah.

Maccabiah IX (1973) — This event was dedicated to the 11 Israeli Olympians murdered by terrorists during the 1972 Munich Olympics. (Russell Perlman participated.)

Maccabiah X (1977) — “The Jubilee Maccabiah” marked 25 years of Maccabiah competition. More than 2,700 competitors from 33 countries participated.

Maccabiah XI (1981) — The games honored the memory of Maccabiah World Union President and International Maccabiah Games Committee President Pierre Gildesgame who died in a car accident. Thirty countries sent 3,450 to play in the games. Dan Shayes, the future Denver Nugget, played for the American basketball squad.

Maccabiah XII (1985) — Olympic legend Mark Spitz opened the games lighting a torch along with three children of Israeli Olympians murdered at the Munich Olympics. Four thousand sportsman from 40 countries attended the games. The junior Maccabiah was established.

Maccabiah XIII (1889) — The opening torch was carried by former world swimming champion Hanoch Budin, an IDF disabled veteran. The event brought together 4,500 athletes from 45 countries.

Maccabiah XIV (1993)— A total 5,500 athletes from 57 nations competed.

Maccabiah XV (1997) — Former Montreal Canadien coach Jacques Demers led a Canadian hockey squad consisting of numerous NHL players. The event was marred when a pedestrian bridge collapsed and four Australian athletes were killed and more than 60 other people were injured. (Melissa Perlman participated as a junior member of the track team.)

Maccabiah XVI (2001) — On the verge of cancellation because of ongoing violence, the 16th Maccabiah attracted more than 3,000 athletes from 41 Countries to participate in 44 sports. Women’s basketball returned to the Games and women’s soccer was added. U.S. Olympic swimming gold medalist and former world record holder, Lenny Krayzelburg earned a gold and set a new Maccabiah record in the 100 meter backstroke.

Maccabiah XVII (2005) — Some 7,000 athletes from 55 countries participated in the 2005 Maccabiah Games.

Maccabiah XVIII (2009) — Approximately 9,000 athletes from 54 countries participated.

Next up: Maccabiah XVIV (2013) – Melissa Perlman to participate again. Interested in supporting and keeping the tradition going? Click here.