Tag Archives: shoes

Fleet Feet Sports Delray Beach Now Open!

fleet feet 1Welcome to Delray Beach Fleet Feet Sports! Our friend (and fellow South Florida Runs member) Nicholas Stump just celebrated the grand opening of his new store Fleet Feet Sports Delray Beach and we’re super excited for him and his wife Mackenzie.

We’ve had the pleasure of hearing some of the fun (and challenging) stories as they prepared for opening and we are thrilled to hear the store is open and shoppable!!! Be sure to check them out on the North-East corner of Linton Blvd and Federal in Delray Beach (same shopping plaza as Panera, Fresh Market and Zone Fresca)!

More about Fleet Feet Sports

At Fleet Feet Sports, you will find a welcoming environment where runners, walkers and fitness enthusiasts of all abilities receive unparalleled service and support. Fleet Feet Sports’ Fitlosophy is to help you find the right ”FIT” in every facet of your active lifestyle. Our goal is to engage and inspire all ages to live a fit and healthy lifestyle. We are committed to helping everyone achieve their goals, celebrate their accomplishments, and win everyday! Whether you walk, run, or simply need a good fitting pair of shoes, the educators at Fleet Feet Sports will work with you to evaluate your foot’s gait and natural biomechanics to help you select a shoe that offers the best fit and function for you. Fleet Feet Sports is committed to enhancing and growing our local running and walking communities, and offering educational resources and training opportunities to assist you in achieving your fitness goals.  Each store is locally owned and operated.

Learn more at www.fleetfeetdelray.com or at www.facebook.com/fleetfeetdelray.

THINGS ARE CHANGING in 2013

Okay runners – get ready for some NEW and EXCITING stuff coming your way in 2013. And only on RunningTips101.com.

Every few

weeks – we will be focusing on and unveiling new TIPS meant just for you Tips will fall in a number of categories including (but not limited to) Shoes, Gear, Running Routes, Workouts, Health Providers, Food, Beverage, Wellness and much more.

You tell me what you want to learn about. And I’ll provide the information, the product, the SAMPLES, the testing (with my crew of runners), the reviews/results, and more.

Interested in having your product reviewed?! Sent an email. Send your product. And we will see what we can do!

Start emptying out your closet!!! This is going to be fun!!!

 

Custom-Fitted Orthotics: Why You Need Them

Last week I picked up my first pair of orthotics ever from Dr. David Rudnick at the Chiropractic & Sports Rehabilitation Institute in Boynton Beach. As I’ve said before, I never had any aches or pains in high school so never really considered using them. However, with a recent string of injuries (knee, foot, etc.), I figured it was a great time to start. And Dr. Rudnick suggested them – having worked on my foot numerous times and seen the results of nearly two decades of running on an extremely high arch.

So with this post, I hope to share my feedback on Week One with my new orthotics and answer some common questions!!

Why custom-fit orthotics? Rather than the store-bought versions? 
This is is a question I have gotten from a few of my students since showing up at practice with my new “feet.” And it’s a question that I found all over the internet. Custom-fit orthotics are exactly that…specifically made, measured, and fit to your feet. In fact, when Dr. Rudnick fit me for the orthotics, questions such as “How much do you run,” “What surfaces do you typically run on,” and “What part of your foot do you typically land on,” are all asked, in addition to the foam box casting. This should answer the question of “which to buy” in itself. The custom-fit orthotics are made for your feet and your feet alone. When you purchase orthotics out of the machine in the store – you can only be fit into the ones stocked – option A, B, C or D.

I asked Dr. Rudnick this question and he explained that while some people can get away with store-bought orthotics, it’s not the norm. “One of the available options stored in the machine may be the right match for you, but they can’t be right for everyone,” Rudnick said. “Unfortunately they can’t stock everyone’s specific foot needs. That’s where custom-fit orthotics come in. They do fit your specific needs.”

Watch the custom-fitted orthotics foam box casting here.

From my research on many websites, the only negatives listed next to custom-fit orthotics were: the time it takes between ordering and receiving the orthotics (for me – it was 10 days) and the cost (they are a few hundred dollars so more expensive than the store-bought version – but you get what you pay for as they say)!

How do they feel?
Since picking my new orthotics up and fitting them into my shoes to wear, I have gotten used to the feeling very quickly. It almost feels as though I have an extra bump in my shoe where the space under my arch used to be. And I like the feeling – the rubbing feels as though I am receiving a massage on the bottom of my foot with each step. Dr. Rudnick suggested I only wear the orthotics for a few hours at a time the first few days – until I get used to them. So while I did this at first, I quickly realized how much I enjoyed wearing them and ironically switched from wearing sandals everywhere to putting on my sneakers (with orthotics fit inside of course).

So with orthotics in, and my training hopefully back to normal over the next few weeks…I will continue to update you on how I feel. Feel free to write in any questions you have for me or Dr. David Rudnick and I will get them answered ASAP.

Learn more a bout Dr. Rudnick’s practice here: Chiropractic & Sports Rehabilitation Institute.

Barefoot Running – Yay or Nay?

After my experience with Skechers GOrun shoes yesterday…I was reminded of this article from Dr. David Rudnick’s Chiropractic & Sports Rehabilitation Institute’s August – September 2012 Newsletter. It’s all about barefoot running. I’ve included the article below – but it’s also available in its original format here. (Read more about Dr. David Rudnick in our expert resources section.)

Barefoot Running – Yay or Nay?

“If you want to follow the fad craze these days, just look to companies like Vibram, Merrell and Nike. Vibram is the company that has brought you the soles and treads of many of the shoes you have worn over the years and of course Nike are the people who first brought you the “running shoe” as we know it today. Nike first brought us the waffle bottom trainer, cross trainer, air pockets, “shocks,” Air Jordan, and now its barefoot minimalist series—the Nike Free.”

What initially stymied us when these “barefoot” style shoes first came out was the obvious question: “Why would the same brands that sell us the shoes and offer so many varieties to choose from, now be advocating that we train barefoot, or close to it? “ But are they? The Nike shoes have light-weight, thin, flexible soles and thin vamp top cover material to hold the shoe onto the foot; the Vibram version is more simplistic—a rubber sock with compartments for each individual toe.

So why would Nike and Vibram both go against their own creations and advocate that we begin walking and running barefoot, or at least become “shoe-minimalists” after decades of building shoe and sole lines? There appears to be sound moral reasoning if you delve into the research, but you have to look closely; and if you’d like to try one of the creations, you have to be aware of your personal foot type – but that’s for another day.

Current research has been conducted showing the following:

  • Plantar (bottom of the foot) sensory feedback plays a central role in safe and effective locomotion;
  • More shoe cushioning can lead to higher impact forces on the joints and risk of injury;
  • Unshod (without shoes) lowers contact time of the foot;
  • There are higher braking and pushing impulses in shod versus unshod running;
  • Unshod running presents a reduction of impact peak force that would reduce the high mechanical stress that occurs during repetitive running; and
  • A bare foot induces a neural-mechanical adaptation which could enhance the storage and restitution of elastic energy at ankle extensor level.
  • These are only some of the more significant findings. These issues will not only support injury management benefits for the barefoot runner but increase speed, force and power output.

“Stepping backwards in time a little…during caveman days things were very different and the foot was left bare from birth until death. As a result the foot both developed and appeared different. The sole of the foot was thicker and callused due to constant contact with rough surfaces; the foot was more muscular; it was probably wider in the forefoot; and the toes were likely slightly separated due to the demands of griping the ground. Overall, the foot simply worked differently; it worked better; and it worked more like the engineering marvel it truly is. However, as time went on, man messed with a good thing and took a foot that was highly sensitive with a significant sensory and motor representation in the brain and he covered it up with a slab of leather and/or rubber. Further, man then flattened and then paved the world and his home with cement, wood, pavement and/or tile and successfully completed the total sensory information deprivation of the foot. Not only did man take away critical adaptive skills from himself, he began the deprivation of critical information from which the central nervous system needs to develop and function effectively.”

As a result, we now affix a shoe to a child’s foot before he or she can walk. When the baby begins to walk, all propriosensory information necessary for the development of critical spinal and central nervous system reflexes is virtually absent. Therefore, is it any wonder why there are so many people in chronic pain from postural disorders related to central core weakness and inhibition? Is it any wonder why so many people have flat, incompetent feet and arches? Man has done it to himself. But thankfully man has proven he can undo what has been done. There is much modern medical research that has uncovered the woes of our ways. And as a result, companies like Nike and Vibram are developing devices that will allow some protection from modern day offenses like glass, plastic and metal, but also allow for the slow, gradual return to caveman days.

There are many shoes available that have potentially serious biomechanical flaws. We are happy to discuss our sound reasoning regarding these shoes and their impact on your condition during a consultation. Shoes need to be specifically chosen for your foot type, activity type, walking and/or running style and muscle weaknesses. The wrong shoe choice can in itself be a cause of pain or problems and lead to abnormal mechanics or physical problems.

Potential Harms of Barefoot Running

  • Suddenly going barefoot or wearing a minimalist shoe can be quite a shock to the foot. But that isn’t the only concern one should have when starting a shoeless workout. Runners and walkers alike should keep the following in mind:
  • Why Fix What Isn’t Broken?
  • If you have no problems, no pain, do you need to change anything?
  • Little Foot Protection
  • Shoes offer a significant amount of protection from road debris such as glass, nails, rocks and thorns. They also offer insulation in cold weather and protect us from frostbite in ice and snow.
  • Achilles Tendinitis and Calf Strain
  • Most of us aren’t used to running barefoot, so a minimalist shoe will be a shock to our feet. Also, our muscles will feel overworked. In some cases, this can lead to injury (e.g. Achilles tendinitis or calf strain).
  • May Increase Plantar Pain
  • The bottom of the feet (plantar surface) for most people is soft and tender. Going without a stiff-soled shoe may initially cause plantar pain, or increase the risk of plantar fasciitis.
  • Get Ready for Blisters
  • Almost everyone who switches to a minimal shoe or starts going shoeless will find themselves battling blisters for the first few weeks until calluses are formed.
  • You Will Look Strange
  • Face it: People will notice and they may stare!

*Parts of this article were from a research paper “Thoughts & Research for the Shoe Minimalist” by Dr. Shawn Allen, Dr. Ivo Waerlop, Chris Korfist.

Study by Harvard University on barefoot running.

Rain, Rain, Go Away!

Sofia from my high school running team after a "soaking wet run." She has already started drying her shoes!

It’s been raining in South Florida for what feels like four days straight! And many of us refuse to be kept inside (or on a treadmill) for so many days in a row…So we go out there and run in the rain! Our clothing and shoes end up soaked (as do we)! And drying most of our belongings is pretty straightforward…right? Well, not so with our sneakers/running shoes. How do you correctly dry your running shoes after they’ve been soaked in the rain?!

Well there is a right way (see below) and a wrong way (throwing them in the dryer at high heat and hoping they don’t melt or shrink!). Here is the correct way:

  1. Take your shoes off.
  2. Take the insoles out (orthodics too if you use them) and stuff the shoes with newspaper. (Make sure the shoes are filled with the paper but don’t stuff in so much that you change the shape of the shoe!).
  3. Place shoes in a warm, dry area with circulating air (near a vent, dryer, etc.) or out in the sun – as long as the rain has stopped! Back in the day, when you could fit your shoes under the refridgerator – this was a good option. Not sure you can still do that with most new kitchens.
  4. Change the newspaper after an hour or so – and maybe a couple hours after that, depending on how wet the paper gets. (Most likely will have to do this consistently until your next run – 24 or so hours later.

This is another good reason why we should all have at least two pairs of running shoes that we alternate. It’s good overall they say…and of course for reasons like this.

Of course, if all of this work is too much for you…and you live in a really wet climate where you are constantly drying your running shoes, you may want to invest in a “shoe dryer.” Yes they have them…Here is one recommended option! The Peet Shoe Dryer